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arati_mejdal

Staff

Joined:

May 21, 2014

Looking Back and Ahead to JMP Academic Webcasts

It’s that time of year for academics, the start of a new semester. The JMP academics team is busy preparing for the academic Webcasts we deliver at the beginning of each semester. We thought it would be interesting to share with you our results from our fall Webcasts. We delivered four sessions called “JMP Basics for Professors and Students,” and 148 people attended with a 98% satisfaction rating.


The 148 people were made up of 28% each graduate students, research faculty and teaching faculty.




If we combine the categories for students and teachers, we can see that 90% of our attendees were students, teaching faculty and research faculty.




Somewhat surprising to us was that the No. 1 discipline among attendees was life, health or physical sciences, followed by general and social or behavioral sciences. These three groups made up 77% of our audience. In academics, we have traditionally had many users in the business and economics group as well as the engineering or computer science group, so we were happy to see so much interest from people in the first three groups as well.




Other fun facts about our attendees include that 28% were Mac users and 72% were Windows users. About 70% said they had little JMP experience. And we had attendees from 32 states.


Starting on January 28, we will be hosting the same Webcast as in the fall, “JMP Basics for Professors and Students,” as well as a new Webcast called “Teaching Statistical Concepts with JMP.”


“JMP Basics for Professors and Students” will be offered on Jan. 28 and Feb. 9, 12, 15, 19 and 24 at a variety of times. This Webcast covers an overview of basics for teaching or using JMP for elementary and intermediate statistics courses.


“Teaching Statistical Concepts with JMP” will be offered on Feb. 10 and 23 at 1:00 p.m. EST. This Webcast covers the resources available to help teach statistics using JMP.


You can register to attend one or both of these. Hope you’ll join us and spread the word!

1 Comment
Community Member

CrisisMaven wrote:

For economics students or researchers: I have just added a Reference List (http://crisismaven.wordpress.com/references/) to my economics blog with economic data series, history, bibliographies etc. for students & researchers. Currently 100+ meta sources, it will in the next days grow to over a thousand. Check it out and if you miss something, feel free to leave a comment.