Choose Language Hide Translation Bar
bgeaibreyi
Community Trekker

RE: Gauge R&R Definitions

Hi,

 

I am conducting a Gauge R&R study for the first time for a measurement system. I have a few questions.

 

1. In the attached sample report, there're two Gauge R&R numbers circled in red and blue. It looks like the blue accounts for operator and measurement variations while the red in addition accounts for part variations. Which of the two numbers apply to the "0 - 10% excellent, 10 - 20% adequate, 20 - 30% acceptable, >30% unacceptable"? Or they're both applicable? 

 

2. How do I select K, the sigma multiplier? It looks K is proportional to all the variations but the overall %Gauge R&R doesn't change. We don't have a 6 sigma process. What do I base on to select this factor?

 

Thanks,

 

Gary

0 Kudos
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

RE: Gauge R&R Definitions

The guidance about evaluating Gauge R&R applies to the estimate circled in red.

 

Click the red triangle at the top of the platform and select Gauge Studies > Gauge R&R. You are presented with a dialog box:

Capture.PNG

 

The multipliier k is the first parameter with a default value of 6.

Learn it once, use it forever!

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
3 REPLIES 3

RE: Gauge R&R Definitions

The guidance about evaluating Gauge R&R applies to the estimate circled in red.

 

Click the red triangle at the top of the platform and select Gauge Studies > Gauge R&R. You are presented with a dialog box:

Capture.PNG

 

The multipliier k is the first parameter with a default value of 6.

Learn it once, use it forever!

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
Highlighted
bgeaibreyi
Community Trekker

RE: Gauge R&R Definitions

Thanks Mark for clarifying. 

 

Regarding my second question, I'm more asking what's the rationale behind JMP using 6? I've also heard that 5.15 is used in some practice. Can I change this sigma multiplier to any arbitrary number like 3? 

 

Gary

0 Kudos

RE: Gauge R&R Definitions

The multiplier depends on where you practice. For example, companies that follow the AIAG standard will use k = 5.15, but not everyone does.

 

Yes, you can enter any multiplier in the dialogl.

Learn it once, use it forever!
0 Kudos