Choose Language Hide Translation Bar
john_sall
Staff
30 years of JMP

30-years-jmp.pngWe created JMP 30 years ago because we saw a clear need. Scientists and engineers had data – but not the statistics background or coding skills necessary to explore and analyze that data.  

They wanted something interactive and easy to learn on a limited budget. While they were in technical disciplines, they didn’t want to be technical from a programming point of view. 

The statistical initiatives of the time included Tukey’s Exploratory Data Analysis and the emphasis on graphics, punctuated notably by the Anscombe Quartet published in 1973. It became important to look at your data in a graph. 

When JMP was first released in October 1989, its original goals were: 

  • Find the best ways to exploit the emergence of the point-and-click GUI of the Macintosh. 
  • Find the best statistical graphics to go with each statistical method. 
  • Provide a new product that was relatively inexpensive and easy to use, and would serve as an entry-level step for SAS and for those who didn’t need a product as big as SAS. 

As a result, JMP offered linked selection, context clicking everywhere and a graph for every statistical test. JMP has grown from a limited product with a limited audience to a mature product with a wide audience. It’s amazing to see how analytics helps our customers solve problems and innovate.  

This month, we celebrate the origins of JMP. We also celebrate the future. You can learn more about our new versions – JMP 15 and JMP Pro 15as well as our new product, JMP Live. JMP continues to be a desktop product, but now it can publish live reports, accessible to everyone in the private community. With JMP Live, publishing, sharing and community become new strengths. 

That’s why we’ve been around for 30 years: We like empowering you to do more with your data. 

Continue to read the JMP Blog this month for celebratory posts from longtime JMP users and thought leader perspectives on important topics in analytics.