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How to install JMP add ins using a batch

j_bonnouvrier

Community Trekker

Joined:

Dec 19, 2012

Hi,

 

I have developped some JMP add-ins and I would like to install a "basic kit" for each new JMP user in my company.

How is that possible?

 

Thanks,

 

 

Jérôme

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
ian_jmp

Staff

Joined:

Jun 23, 2011

Solution

Probably the best answer to this is a function of how many users you need to serve, and how quickly your add-ins are developed or change.

 

One way would be to put your add-ins in a shared folder, then use the JMP start-up file to scan this folder for new or revised add-ins and install them locally. If you wanted to also remove add-ins you could add logic to detect add-ins that are currently installed, but are no longer in the folder. Of course this would require that you initially have a means to distribute the start-up file itself.

txnelson

Super User

Joined:

Jun 22, 2012

Solution

Adding to Ian's comments, the last enterprize wide system of Addin's that I put together actually required only a script added to each JMP users startup file, along with a .jmpcust(change to the pull down menus).  The pull down menu basically popped up a Web Browser Window, which listed the Addins available.  Using the Web Browser Window allowed for the addition to the list of addins without having to go out and touch each JMP user's system.  When a user selected an addin, it installed the adding in a standard JMP fashion.  However, each adding was written such that the first thing it did when run, was to download a new copy of itself, and write it to the addin's directory.  Then run the addin script.  This ensured that the user always had the most recent copy of the addin.  The overhead of copying the addin proved to be unnoticable to the users.  The reason the code was copied and not just run from the central site was that the addins checked to see if the required network connection was ther, and if not, the addin ran the version that was copied down the last time the addin was run. This system was very successful and continues to run after it's implementation back when JMP 9 was just released.

Jim
4 REPLIES
ian_jmp

Staff

Joined:

Jun 23, 2011

Solution

Probably the best answer to this is a function of how many users you need to serve, and how quickly your add-ins are developed or change.

 

One way would be to put your add-ins in a shared folder, then use the JMP start-up file to scan this folder for new or revised add-ins and install them locally. If you wanted to also remove add-ins you could add logic to detect add-ins that are currently installed, but are no longer in the folder. Of course this would require that you initially have a means to distribute the start-up file itself.

txnelson

Super User

Joined:

Jun 22, 2012

Solution

Adding to Ian's comments, the last enterprize wide system of Addin's that I put together actually required only a script added to each JMP users startup file, along with a .jmpcust(change to the pull down menus).  The pull down menu basically popped up a Web Browser Window, which listed the Addins available.  Using the Web Browser Window allowed for the addition to the list of addins without having to go out and touch each JMP user's system.  When a user selected an addin, it installed the adding in a standard JMP fashion.  However, each adding was written such that the first thing it did when run, was to download a new copy of itself, and write it to the addin's directory.  Then run the addin script.  This ensured that the user always had the most recent copy of the addin.  The overhead of copying the addin proved to be unnoticable to the users.  The reason the code was copied and not just run from the central site was that the addins checked to see if the required network connection was ther, and if not, the addin ran the version that was copied down the last time the addin was run. This system was very successful and continues to run after it's implementation back when JMP 9 was just released.

Jim
M_Anderson

Staff

Joined:

Nov 21, 2014

There are also a number of scripts and references in the community for doing this kind of thing.  The one that I used had an add-in repository sitting on a server (a method developed by Brady Brady).  There was also a Discovery talk on this last year.  References are below.

 

Make a Self-updating JMP Add-in Depot (the original article by @brady_brady)

 

How to write self-updating JMP Add-ins (a blog by @Jeff_Perkinson with the scripts for Brady's method)

 

A Platform for Managing Distributing and Tracking Add-Ins (a discovery 2016 talk by John Moore)

j_bonnouvrier

Community Trekker

Joined:

Dec 19, 2012

Thanks to all of you for your help. Many solutions, I need to find the most adapted to my company!