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Diana_Levey

Staff

Joined:

Jul 2, 2014

Rhinos, Tigers and now Bears!

“Wild” may not be the way most JMP User Conference attendees described their time on the SAS Campus last week. I’m guessing “educational,” “eye-opening” and even “fun” would be better descriptors for most of the folks who attended the conference and/or the classes around it. But my week had a decidedly wild side to it.


I had the pleasure of spending significant time with keynote speakers Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai, the husband-and-wife wildlife biologist team that founded WildTrack. If you attended the conference, you know that they use JMP to monitor endangered species via a footprint identification technique that marries high-tech solutions such as JMP with the ancient art of animal print identification. Their work has been integral to a variety of conservation projects, the most recent of which is with polar bears. Here’s their story.


In a nutshell, the goal of their work is to help conservation organizations and government agencies around the world protect endangered species in a non-invasive, cost-effective and sustainable way.


As a JMP employee who concentrates on our communications efforts, my goal last week was to help Sky and Zoe spread the word about this very cool work. In addition to local press like UNC-TV and the conference itself, InformationWeek interviewed the couple as well. I’ll be watching to see what kind of story they run.


I also had the pleasure of helping Sky and Zoe connect with some North Carolina research opportunities. Let’s just say that they’ll soon be analyzing animal footprints sent to them from their new friends at the North Carolina Zoo, Carnivore Preservation Trust and North Carolina State University. Perhaps I’ll soon have the pleasure of writing those stories for you. Watch our Customer Stories pages.


27JUL07 - Post updated to include link to InformationWeek article about WildTrack and their use of JMP in studying Polar Bear populations.