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gail_massari

Community Manager

Joined:

Feb 27, 2013

Micro-Loan Program for Ugandan Women Uses JMP

It's exciting to see how JMP users transform data into information, and even more so when the effort involves students.


For the second summer, students at Womens' Microfinance Initiative (WMI) used JMP to evaluate microfinance programs in Uganda. One of this year's students was my college-aged daughter, who introduced me to some women dedicated to using micro-loans to change lives.


Several years ago, Robyn Nietert and a network of professional women in Washington, D.C., founded the non-profit organization called WMI to make loans available to impoverished women who have no access to banking services. Around the same time, on the other side of the U.S., Karon Wright and three other women founded The Greater Contribution, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to using micro-loans to help eradicate poverty. The paths of these two women crossed, and the two organizations now collaborate.


I spoke with Karon Wright about her trip to Uganda to see, firsthand, the impact of the WMI micro-loan programs.


Karon told me the real work takes place on the ground in Uganda, where local women have been trained to administer the program. They collect data when the loan is issued and every six months at the time of subsequent loan applications. One key finding is that most women double their monthly household income after joining the program.






So far, the JMP analysis is done in the U.S. Next year, in Uganda by Ugandan women?


Learn more about WMI and microfinance.