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Jun 23, 2011

Bradley Jones Wins ASQ Brumbaugh Award

The winners of ASQ’s prestigious Brumbaugh Award for 2009 are Bradley Jones, PhD, Principal Research Fellow in the JMP Division of SAS, and Christopher J. Nachtsheim, PhD, Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota.


They co-wrote an article titled “Split-Plot Designs: What, Why, and How” that was published in the Journal of Quality Technology in October 2009. The Brumbaugh Award was founded in 1949 and is presented for the paper, published in the previous year, that the committee decides has made the largest single contribution to the development of industrial application of quality control. In a previous blog post about this article, Bradley explained why you need to know about split-plot designs.


Renowned statistician Cuthbert Daniel said that all industrial experiments are split-plot experiments. That’s the reason why we as experimenters need to understand how to create our experiments that reflect the reality of how they have been executed. For years, scientists have fielded their experiments as split-plot experiments and have erroneously analyzed them as if they had been run in completely randomized fashion.


Today, with the tools available to us in JMP, we are easily able to set up and analyze our design of experiments correctly. In fact, after reading the article by Bradley and Chris, you might conclude that you should intentionally implement split-plot designs since they can be much more attractive with respect to cost, efficiency and validity of the experiment. I highly recommend that anyone involved in conducting experiments check out this article, a PDF file of which is available on the JMP Web site. You too may realize that split-plot designs are the correct approach for your future experimentation.


If you want to see more research by Bradley, view our page on published research by JMP authors.

1 Comment
Community Member

Georgia Morgan wrote:

Brad, Congratulations! You have been influencing the industry tools and methods for design and analysis of experiments for many years, even pre-JMP.

It is well deserved.