Subscribe Bookmark RSS Feed
landra_c

Staff

Joined:

Nov 4, 2015

Get fast helpful answers to your questions

In the JMP User Community, you want correct answers. Fast.
 
Well-crafted questions attract fast answers. First, search to see if someone already answered your question in the community. If not, choose the Community board that best matches your topic and ask your question there.
 
Here are the 3 steps to compose a great question:
 
  1. Write a descriptive subject line. Be specific. "How do I check if values in one data table exist in another data table?” is better than “Newbie Question.”

  2. Use simple language. You might be an expert in non-parametric statistics, but other readers may not be. Explain your problem simply and in context so that a reasonably smart person can understand.
     
  3. A good question includes code and example data.  Even better, include what your output should look like. Remember not to include any confidential data in your posts or anybody’s personal information.
 
 
Now, let’s look at an example:
 
 
Open Database() Errors 
 
I've been working with several JSL scripts... each of them has several Open Database() Calls.. and if the Open Database fails for any reason.. I have always seen entries in the log file regarding the issue...  I then borrowed code from log_execute_sql.jsl I found somewhere... and basically read the last 10 lines of the log file and display dialogs for users if an error occurred....
 
today I started working with a new script, and it seems to not be writing the Open Database() Errors to the log, but rather throwing JMP ALERT Dialog Boxes up .. which is sort of nice, but not quite friendly enough... and I would like to use my function to check for errors....
 
Is there some method of controlling if these go to the log or not??? 
 
 
While it is possible to understand what the user is asking, a more specific subject line that states the question would be helpful. It also helps to include with the question the JMP version, operating system, a screen capture of the error message, and some script examples to make it easier for someone responding to provide a complete answer more quickly.
 
 
Here’s a better way to ask the question:
 
 
Title: How do I get all open database() errors write to log? Sometimes they write to log and other times I get JMP ALERT Dialog Boxes instead.
 
 
I've been working with several JSL scripts, each of them has several Open Database() Calls and if the Open Database fails for any reason, I have always seen entries in the log file regarding the issue. I then borrowed code from log_execute_sql.jsl I found somewhere and basically read the last 10 lines of the log file and display dialogs for users if an error occurred. Today I started working with a new script, and it seems it is not writing the Open Database() Errors to the log, but rather throwing JMP ALERT Dialog Boxes up.
 
I would like to use my function to check for errors. Is there some method of controlling if these go to the log or not? The only difference I can see in this new script I inherited is that it doesn't make any DB calls until AFTER the UI comes up. If I make an Open Database() Call BEFORE the new window is rendered and defined/populates, the error is in the log. How can I make it write them ALL to the log?
 
 
I’m seeing this in both JMP9 and JMP12 on Mac.
 
 
I have attached examples of error messages and scripts.
 
 
The second question setup is ideal because it mentions everything relevant. Notice that the user indicated the JMP version and OS being used and included attachments with error messages and script examples to better illustrate the problem. This question attracts a complete, helpful answer much more quickly.
 
 
Here are a couple more tips:
  • Check “like” beneath answers and community articles you find helpful. This makes the best content rise to the top of community searches where other users easily find them…and rewards those who help you.
  • Ask questions even if English isn’t your first language. Sometimes posting code explains your problem better than a thousand words. If context is needed, post in your native language. Fellow users or the community managers will figure it out.
 
The JMP User Community exists to help you increase your JMP knowledge. Help us help you by asking the best question you can.
Article Labels
Article Tags
Contributors