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Report vs. Journal

vkessler

Community Trekker

Joined:

Dec 23, 2015

Hi everyone,

i have a more general question. What is the basic difference between a JMP report (*.jrp) and a JMP journal (*.jrn)?

When is it advantageous to use a report? And when do you use a journal?

Thank you!

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Solution

In my opinion, the advantages of a JMP Report over a JMP Journal, or the advantages of a JMP Journal over a JMP Report, boils down to the underlying makeup of them.

A JMP Report is actually a JSL script with typically the data table used by the script embedded in it.  When a file with the .jrp extension is opened, JMP automatically runs the embedded script.  So you end up back where you were when you saved the report. That is, as long as you chose to embed the data table in the report, or when you open the report, the data table has been opened in your JMP session. The displayed output is there, as well as the data for it.  You can modify select the red triangle options, etc.  And if you pass a .jrp to another person, when they open it up, they now have a copy of your data too.

A JMP journal is a copy of the report output.  Here the journal can be built from many different items from different reports that are based upon analyses from different data tables.  Once saved, what you have is a replica of the created output.   When you reopen the file, you will see the output from the analysis, however, you do not have the ability to use any of the analytical or display actions available under the red triangles that are there when the analytical or graphical platform was originally run.

So to me, each of them has their own advantages and disadvantages. I use them based upon what I will need when the report or journal is opened up. 

Jim
3 REPLIES
Solution

In my opinion, the advantages of a JMP Report over a JMP Journal, or the advantages of a JMP Journal over a JMP Report, boils down to the underlying makeup of them.

A JMP Report is actually a JSL script with typically the data table used by the script embedded in it.  When a file with the .jrp extension is opened, JMP automatically runs the embedded script.  So you end up back where you were when you saved the report. That is, as long as you chose to embed the data table in the report, or when you open the report, the data table has been opened in your JMP session. The displayed output is there, as well as the data for it.  You can modify select the red triangle options, etc.  And if you pass a .jrp to another person, when they open it up, they now have a copy of your data too.

A JMP journal is a copy of the report output.  Here the journal can be built from many different items from different reports that are based upon analyses from different data tables.  Once saved, what you have is a replica of the created output.   When you reopen the file, you will see the output from the analysis, however, you do not have the ability to use any of the analytical or display actions available under the red triangles that are there when the analytical or graphical platform was originally run.

So to me, each of them has their own advantages and disadvantages. I use them based upon what I will need when the report or journal is opened up. 

Jim
msharp

Super User

Joined:

Jul 28, 2015

Echoing Jim but in my own words, journals are static while reports are dynamic with the typical advantages and disadvantages of both. 

Journals will be smaller files, run faster, and are easier to share.

Reports will allow users to dig into the data and continue the analysis, but will require running the analysis up to the point of the saved report slowing it down. Since it requires embedding the table and script it will also be a larger file.  If the table isn't embedded, it must be saved separately.  These last two facts make it less ideal to share.  Not to mention since the report is live, a users saved preferences, JMP version, or other differences from computer to computer may and will change the output.

vkessler

Community Trekker

Joined:

Dec 23, 2015

Thanks to Jim and msharp. Now i get the idea of reports and journals.