Our World Statistics Day conversations have been a great reminder of how much statistics can inform our lives. Do you have an example of how statistics has made a difference in your life? Share your story with the Community!
Choose Language Hide Translation Bar
Highlighted
jdwatson
Level II

Collaborative analysis

Hi all,

I am relatively new to JMP and have a rather general question about workflows which people have found useful.  I find myself working on analysis collaboratively with input from engineers, technicians, and data scientists, and the question I am asking myself is how best to get data cleaned up (e.g. fixing mislabeled/wrong data, excluding outliers, etc.) and analysis/plotting done in a collaborative fashion.  At the moment each person involved to one degree or another has their own copy of the master data table, and maybe they find that these N rows should be excluded from some analysis due to reason X.  Then someone else puts together an ANOVA.  Then someone else sees the analysis and wonders whether the analysis has identified some new outliers which need to be checked.  Trying to keep everyone's tables synced up with the same analysis, plots, excluded data, etc. is rather tedious, and I am guessing I am not the first person to encounter a situation like this.  Any suggestions?  I suppose putting all the analysis in a git repo could work for small datasets, but I suspect it would get painfully slow as datasets get larger.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
P_Bartell
Level VI

Re: Collaborative analysis

For the producers of the analysis, one suggestion is for everyone in the group to work on the problem using a JMP Project as the holding bin for data tables, journals, pdf files, Excel files, etc. But a bigger issue will be change management procedures and practices. You'll have to set up some principles and practices for all to follow. I suggest a JMP journal or maybe MS Word document in the Project that contains ONLY information about changes people are making. A journal could have links to data tables, reports, dashboards, etc.

 

For consumers of the information, you may want to investigate JMP Live or JMP Public.

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3
Highlighted
P_Bartell
Level VI

Re: Collaborative analysis

For the producers of the analysis, one suggestion is for everyone in the group to work on the problem using a JMP Project as the holding bin for data tables, journals, pdf files, Excel files, etc. But a bigger issue will be change management procedures and practices. You'll have to set up some principles and practices for all to follow. I suggest a JMP journal or maybe MS Word document in the Project that contains ONLY information about changes people are making. A journal could have links to data tables, reports, dashboards, etc.

 

For consumers of the information, you may want to investigate JMP Live or JMP Public.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
jdwatson
Level II

Re: Collaborative analysis

Hi @P_Bartell , 

Thanks for the reply.  Sounds like a JMP Project is worth investigating a bit more.  The change management is indeed the tricky part, though.  JSL scripts are conveniently just ASCII files, so git would work fine, but apart from everyone constantly doing a 'save as' with an updated index/timestamp I'm not really sure how to avoid conflicts when people happen to be working on things at the same time during regular business hours.  Maybe the only option is to have an initial data table and then do *all* analysis/plotting via a big JSL script into which everyone can keep adding new code.  Then via git one could review/resolve merge conflicts in a bit less-chaotic way.

Highlighted
P_Bartell
Level VI

Re: Collaborative analysis

And hopefully you are running JMP 14 or 15 because the JMP Project capability was completely overhauled in version 14. JMP Public and JMP Live were introduced in full functional form with JMP 15. JMP Pro isn't in play here because there is no difference wrt to the JMP Project capability set between JMP and JMP Pro.